December 1st, 2016

Apple Cobbler

A classic that never gets old! Don’t be afraid to use the same apples or a combination of different apples to obtain different tastes and textures.
Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Apples:

  • 6 Apples peeled and cubed
  • 1 tsplemon juice
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp Mulling Spices, ground
  • ½ cup brown sugar
Crust:

  • 1¼ cuprolled oats
  • ½ cup almonds, slivered
  • ¼ cupall-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup butter, softened
Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Mix the apples, lemon juice and vanilla together in a baking dish.
  3. Add the spices and sugar and blend well. Set aside.
  4. In a bowl, mix together oats, almonds, flour and sugar. Add the butter and mix well.
  5. Spread the crust over the apples and place in the oven. Cook for 40-50 minutes.
November 1st, 2016

Bowl of Carrots and Peas

Spice combinations such as the ones used in 1,001 Nights spice blend are traditionally used for meat dishes. Carrots and green peas, however, lend themselves well to sweet and sour flavors. The acidity of the sumac in this blend complements the sweetness of the vegetables.
Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbsp butter
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup carrots, cut in sticks
  • 2 tsp 1,001 Nights spice blend, ground
  • 2 Tbsp sugar or honey
  • ½ cup water
  • salt to taste
Method

  1. Melt butter in a pan on medium heat.
  2. Add onions, carrots, salt, spices and honey. Mix well. Add water and cook covered for 3 to 4 minutes.
  3. Remove cover and mix well.
  4. Add peas when carrots are almost dry and begin to glaze. Mix well. Cover again and lower heat.
  5. Cook for another 5 minutes and serve.
October 1st, 2016

chicken kebobs
Yakitori, or chicken kebabs, are extremely popular in Japan. They’re one of its most emblematic street foods, often served with a cold beer in a bar or Izakaya. We like this recipe with vinegar instead of the sweeter, more traditional mirin. Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup rice vinegar
  • 4 scallions, whites only
  • 1lb chicken in 3 cm cubes
  • Épices de Cru Shichimi Togorashi, for garnish
Method

  1. Soak wooden skewers in water for 30 minutes.
  2. Put soy sauce, sugar and vinegar in a pot. Bring to boil and watch that it doesn’t boil over. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 10 minutes. The sauce should reduce by half. Set aside.
  3. Cut scallions into 3-inch chunks.
  4. Make the kebabs by alternating chicken cubes and onion chunks (around 4-5 pieces for each skewer).
  5. Cook skewers in a hot pan for 5-7 minutes on one side. Flip them and cook until half-cooked, 2-3 minutes.
  6. Dip the kebabs in the sauce, return them to the pot, and cook for another 2-3 minutes.
  7. Dip the kebabs again and cook on the other side until the yakitori is cooked through.
  8. Garnish with shichimi togorashi and serve.
September 1st, 2016

It doesn’t get much easier than this! Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Ingredients:

  • 1½ lb fillet sea bass with skin (or striped bass, red snapper, or yellow perch)
  • Coarse sea salt, about ½ tsp. salt for every 6 oz. fish
  • 1 tsp lemon zest, grated
  • 1 tsp orange zest, grated
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • Juice of ½ orange
  • Salted capers, rinsed, OR caperons (large capers), cut in half
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp Lemon Pepper blend, ground

 

Method

  1. Place fillets in a large dish. Sprinkle with salt on both sides. Cover and refrigerate 20 to 30 minutes.
  2. Rinse fish well in cold running water. Dry well. Slice into four portions. Rub with oil.
  3. In a frying pan (or on the barbecue) grill fish over high heat approximately 3 minutes on either side.
  4. Combine citrus zest, juice, capers, olive oil and pepper.
  5. Serve accompanied with vinaigrette sauce and sautéd watercress.
August 1st, 2016

The simple charm of this recipe lies in the endless possibility of textures we can achieve – depending on the different combinations of nuts used. It is of course also delicious with only one type of nut (adjust the quantities if necessary) or even roasted chickpeas. Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken breasts, deboned
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Salt, pepper, to taste
  • 1 Tbsp Aleppo pepper (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil

For the Dukkha:

  • 4 Tbsp Dukkha spices
  • ¼ cup hazelnuts
  • ¼ cup almonds or pistachios
  • ¼ cup crispy chickpeas

For the yogurt:

  • 1 cup thick, plain yogurt
  • 1 garlic clove, finely grated
  • pinch of salt
Method

  1. Marinate the chicken in lemon juice, salt, pepper, Aleppo pepper, and olive oil – ideally for a few hours.
  2. Grind the dukkha spices finely.
  3. Grind half the hazelnuts, almonds and chickpeas into a medium/fine powder.
  4. Grind the remainder of the nuts to a chunky texture.
  5. Mix them all together and set aside.
  6. Mix the yogurt, garlic and salt. Set aside.
  7. Grill or roast the chicken. Serve garnished with yogurt and dukkha.
July 1st, 2016

This Mexican recipe deliciously combines jicama with pineapple, lime juice and chiles. In its native Mexico, jicama (aka: ‘Mexican Yam’) is often combined with chili powder, fresh citrus fruits, red onion and ginger in salads, soups and cooked dishes. Recipe courtesy of Épices de Cru

Ingredients:

  • 1 small pineapple peeled and cut into ½ inch chunks
  • 1 medium jicama peeled and cut into ½ inch chunks
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 3 Tbsp fresh coriander, coarsely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tsp Pasilla de Oaxaca or any smoked chile
  • Salt, to taste
Method

  1. In a bowl, combine the ingredients and mix well.
  2. Check seasoning and adjust to your taste with more lime juice, chili powder or salt.
June 1st, 2016

Our friend Sylviane is a fantastic cook who, like the rest of us, is known to forget things in the oven. One day, she served the most delicious, dark-roasted vegetables, crisped to perfection. The natural sugars of the fresh produce and the fact that they had been left to sweat in the salted spice blend for 2 hours prior to roasting created a dark crust that was impossible to resist.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch of small, fresh carrots with leaves
  • 1 large fennel bulb
  • 1 large parsnip
  • 1 Tbsp Cajun blackening spices, ground
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
Method

  1. Clean carrots well without peeling them. Cut fennel and parsnip into pieces the size of the carrots.
  2. Put vegetables in a bowl with spices and oil. Mix, making sure to cover the vegetables evenly. Let rest for 2 hours before placing on a baking sheet.
  3. Heat oven to 375°F. Cook for 30 minutes before turning vegetables. Check every 10 minutes to ensure that vegetables are caramelized to your liking as cooking time may vary.
May 25th, 2016

This is the perfect salad which allows us to take full advantage of the first spring vegetable harvest. We prefer not to mix the ingredients before serving – one of the charms of this recipe is the contrasting tastes and textures of the various ingredients. Serve accompanied by a chilled glass of white wine and fresh bread!

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups baby spinach leaves
  • 1 pack asparagus
  • 4 radishes sliced
  • 1 cup fiddleheads, blanched ***
  • 1 bunch chives, chopped
  • 2 eggs (optional)
  • Olive Oil
  • Vinegar of choice or lemon juice
  • Balinese Fleur de sel
  • Black Pepper, freshly ground
Method

  1. Wash and drain spinach. Place on a large serving dish.
  2. Break off the tough sections of asparagus. Slice raw asparagus into ½ inch thick pieces at an angle.
  3. Poach the eggs for 7 min in a large pot of water that is almost at the boiling point.
  4. Place asparagus, radishes, fiddleheads, eggs and chives on the spinach leaves.
  5. Sprinkle the vegetables with olive oil and then with vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Serve without mixing.

*** Wash the fiddleheads in a large basin of water. Cut off the brown tips. Boil in a large pot of salted water for 6-7 min. Rinse well in cold water. Drain.
Recipe adapted from Épices de Cru

April 1st, 2016

This recipe reproduces Roman Imperial flavors as faithfully as possible using ingredients available today. Since sugar was unknown to the Romans, it’s more authentic with pekmez (grape molasses) or honey in sweet and sour dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pork tenderloins
  • 3 Tbsp Apicius Roman blend, ground
  • Salt, to taste
  • ½ cup flour
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small leek (white part only), chopped
  • ¼ cup wine
  • 3 Tbsp pekmez* or vino cotto or 2 Tbsp honey
  • 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
Method

  1. Cut pork into slices 1 inch thick. Season with spices and some salt. Roll each slice in flour. Shake lightly to remove excess flour.
  2. Heat a large pan on medium. Add the oil and brown the pork medallions, about 5 minutes.
  3. Flip each medallion then add the leeks, sprinkling them around the pork. Cook for another 5 minutes, or until the leeks begin to brown.
  4. Deglaze with the wine, then add the pekmez, vinegar, and fish sauce. Reduce the sauce for a few minutes, turning the meat occasionally.

*Pekmez is made from concentrated grape juice, still used in Turkey (it can be found under the name “grape molasses”). In Italy, it’s called vino cotto.
Recipe adapted from Épices de Cru

April 1st, 2016

An easy vegetarian side dish or hearty lunch. Classical Roman chefs wouldn’t have used sugar, but grape molasses (pekmez) or honey.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large leek
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp Apicius Roman blend, ground
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, chopped
  • 2 cups chickpeas, cooked
  • Salt to taste
  • ¼ cup pekmez* or 3 Tbsp honey
  • 3 Tbsp vinegar
Method

  1. Wash the leek and cut into ½ inch (1.5 cm) slices.
  2. Heat a pot on medium. Sauté the leek in the oil for around 5 minutes.
  3. Add the garlic and spices. Toss in the pan for another minute.
  4. Add the remaining ingredients and simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. Adjust the flavours to your taste with the salt, vinegar and pekmez.

*Pekmez is made from concentrated grape juice, still used in Turkey (it can be found under the name “grape molasses”). In Italy, it’s called vino cotto.
Recipe adapted from Épices de Cru