Featured Foods

January 2015 – Hearty Foods to Warm up your Winter Blues

Gotthelf Cheese Gotthelf Cheese

Fondue anew with the help of this original Swiss cheese meant for melting. Master cheesemaker, Niklaus Kaser, developed this cheese in the style of the iconic 200lb Emmenthal wheels. Though a fraction of the size, Gotthelf displays a subtle and nuanced character that deserves attention.

Little Mountain Cheese Little Mountain Cheese

Made by the Roelli family, who have been in the Wisconsin milk business for generations. Little Mountain is a nod to their Swiss heritage, the cow’s milk and aging process is uniquely Roelli.

Alpha Tolman Cheese Alpha Tolman Cheese

From the growing family of Jasper Hill original cheeses, Alpha Tolman is an Alpine-inspired aged cow’s milk cheese with a local Northern Vermont flair and character to match.

Breakfast Sausage Throw Down Breakfast Sausage Throw Down

I can’t think of a better way to start a snowy January morning than to fry up some breakfast sausage. Luckily here at the deli there are two different styles, from two different companies to chose from, patty or link, Grandma’s Broadbent or Edwards Breakfast Link. I recommend getting both and having a little contest in your kitchen for supremacy.

Spencer’s Back Bacon and Bangers Spencer’s Back Bacon and Bangers

Made by our English friends in Chicago, these tasty British-style treats are hard to beat this side of the Atlantic. Choose your delight with either the Irish back bacon or the Banger sausages. You really can’t go wrong with either one.

Mahjoub Sauces and Couscous Mahjoub Sauces and Couscous

Mahjoub’s family recipes for sauce and couscous have had us raving for years. We’re celebrating a slight change in the already great recipe that just makes it even better (they’ve added more tomato). Buy any two sauces and get a jar of the hand-rolled couscous FREE.

Balsamic Blowout Balsamic Blowout

These prices are not forever, but the vinegar is as fantastic as ever. Stock up, give a friend of gift, whatever you do don’t miss out on these amazing deals.

Vecchia Dispensa’s 6 Year Aged Balsamic
was $18.99, now $14.99

Best buy balsamic.
This is the best entry point to the world of better-than-basic-balsamic we’ve found. Without a doubt, it’s head and shoulders above the caramel colored, sugar sweetened factory-made stuff that’s on the shelves in supermarkets.

Made just for us by the same folks that make the 8 and 10 year balsamic. You won’t see the age of the vinegar on the bottle because of some funny Italian laws, just the vinegar’s density. Ideal for everyday salad eating and any dish that could benefit from a splash of bright sweetness.

Vecchia Dispensa’s 8 Year Aged Balsamic
was $24.99, now $19.99

A great everyday vinegar.
Working just off the historic square in the center of the old town of Castelvetro, southwest of Modena, Italy, Roberta Pelloni and her husband Marino Tintori make a range of great vinegars. Although Americans tend to gravitate toward sweet caramel-flavored balsamics, Marino is quick to emphasize that “the key to great Balsamico is balance.” Exaggerating sweetness is an easy way to enhance appeal and reduce the need for proper blending and aging. You might not notice it at first, but after many uses, overly sweet balsamics get kind of dull. Not so with those from the Tintoris. We’ve been selling them for over a decade, and they have a legion of followers who return to them again and again.

Their 8 year aged balsamic is many of our customers’ favorite everyday vinegar. (You won’t see the age of the vinegar on the bottle because of some funny Italian laws, just the vinegar’s density.) It’s affordable and strikes an elegant balance—lush with a patient fruitiness and just a touch of the barrel’s aging beginning to show. A great buy.

Vecchia Dispensa’s 10 Year Aged Balsamic
was $34.99, now $24.99

Our most popular balsamic.
Working just off the historic square in the center of the old town of Castelvetro, southwest of Modena, Italy, Roberta Pelloni and her husband Marino Tintori make a range of great vinegars. Although Americans tend to gravitate toward sweet caramel-flavored balsamics, Marino is quick to emphasize “the key to great Balsamico is balance.” Exaggerating sweetness is an easy way to enhance appeal and reduce the need for proper blending and aging. You might not notice it at first, but after many uses overly sweet balsamics get kind of dull. Not so with those from the Tintoris. We’ve been selling them for over a decade, and they have a legion of followers who return to them again and again.

A staff and customer favorite, their 10 year aged balsamic is the most intensely flavored balsamic of its age I’ve ever tried. (You won’t see the age of the vinegar on the bottle because of some funny Italian laws, just the vinegar’s density.) Its complexity, with rich flavors of oak, blackberry and dark fruit, is partly due to aging in very small batches. That allows more evaporation and contact with the barrel—both of which contribute to more intense flavors. Although aged for only 25 percent longer than the 8 year balsamic, the intensity of flavor is almost double.
Highly recommended.

Vecchia Dispensa’s Sweet 16 Year Aged Balsamic
was $44.99, now $29.99

Zingerman’s exclusive balsamic.
Working just off the historic square in the center of the old town of Castelvetro, southwest of Modena, Italy, Roberta Pelloni and her husband Marino Tintori make a range of great vinegars. Although Americans tend to gravitate toward sweet caramel-flavored balsamics, Marino is quick to emphasize that “the key to great Balsamico is balance.” Exaggerating sweetness is an easy way to enhance appeal and reduce the need for proper blending and aging. You might not notice it at first, but after many uses, overly sweet balsamics get kind of dull. Not so with those from the Tintoris. We’ve been selling them for over a decade, and they have a legion of followers who return to them again and again.

This one is made just for us. Blended to capture the woody, earthy intensity of our 10 year aged balsamic and rounded out with a dose of lush sweetness, the kind you’ll find in older bottles. This one is 16 years old, ready for the debutante ball. (You won’t see the age of the vinegar on the bottle because of some funny Italian laws, just the vinegar’s density.) Don’t miss it.

Vecchia Dispensa’s 20 Year Aged Balsamic
was $59.99, now $49.99

A wonderfully sweet, rich elixir that makes a fantastic gift. From the same great beginnings as the tradizionales, but aged solely in oak barrels.

Vecchia Dispensa’s 30 Year Anniversary Balsamic
was $49.99, now $29.99

Loads of flavor.
Working just off the historic square in the center of the old town of Castelvetro, southwest of Modena, Italy, Roberta Pelloni and her husband Marino Tintori make a range of great vinegars. Although Americans tend to gravitate toward sweet caramel-flavored balsamics, Marino is quick to emphasize that “the key to great Balsamico is balance.” Exaggerating sweetness is an easy way to enhance appeal and reduce the need for proper blending and aging. You might not notice it at first, but after many uses overly sweet balsamics get kind of dull. Not so with those from the Tintoris. We’ve been selling them for over a decade, and they have a legion of followers who return to them again and again.

Roberta and Marino have bottled only a very small amount of this special non-tradizionale vinegar. Dense and intense, it coats the interior of the bottle like molasses. The long-lasting taste will leave you deep in reflection; a thimbleful adds complex, sweet depth to sauces or dressings. With much of the flavor of balsamics that cost twice as much, it’s a great deal for a great vinegar. You won’t see the age of the vinegar on the bottle because of some funny Italian laws, just the vinegar’s density.
Buy a bottle and save it for special occasions. It will last nearly forever.

Modena White Label Balsamic
was $124.99, now $99.99

Tested, tasted, and approved by the most discerning food consortium in Italy.
These are the vinegars about which legends have been woven. Savoring one is an experience to brag about. Buy one for a grand occasion. A golden anniversary. A wedding. A newborn. An election. Made from the must—freshly pressed juice—of Trebbiano grapes. The must is cooked down in open copper kettles to half its original volume, then put into wood to age for a dozen years.

But that’s just the beginning. It’s taken out and tested by a panel of judges. The qualifiers in Modena are graded gold and white (different than in neighboring Reggio Emilia, where they’re graded gold, silver, red). Then they return to the wood for another five, ten, twenty, or a hundred years or more. During the aging process, the vinegar is shifted from one type of wood to the next. Cherry, chestnut, oak and mulberry all leave their imprint on the flavor of the vinegar.

The result is an almost unbelievable concentration of sweet-sour flavor in a dense, intense, brown-black vinegar that hints of berries, grapes, vanilla. There is nothing like it in the world. Only a tiny amount is released each year, in elegant glass flasks. Let loose a few drops on ripe strawberries fresh from the market. An amazing treat you’ll always remember.All traditional balsamics from Modena are bottled in Ferrari designer Giorgio Guigiaro’s streamlined, sexy bottle, then gift boxed. They may all look the same, but the vinegar is not. We buy ours from Erika Barbieri, one of the only women balsamic makers. I think her vinegars are consistently fantastic—and the juniper aged version is unique.

Aged Balsamic Sampler
was $29.99, now $19.99

Don’t break the bank.
Tasting a well-aged balsamic can be an amazing experience. But unless your bank account is ample, it can be a costly hobby. Here’s a way around it. This set comes with precious, small bottles of La Vecchia Dispensa’s aged balsamics, about an ounce total (the strawberry is illustrated next to the bottles for scale).

Like vials of perfume, just way tastier. Include a loaf of Paesano Bread or a bottle of Zingerman’s Olive Oil to complete the package.

There have been some changes in the Italian laws in labeling balsamic vinegars. Where producers used to use ages to denote the flavor and quality of a vinegar, today they must use density to accomplish the same task. Now, each little vial notes its density. The lower the density, the younger the vinegar.

Organic Balsamic Vinegar
was $24.99, now $19.99

From Vecchia Dispensa, our favorite balsamic vinegar makers. A younger balsamic made from organic grapes. As elegant as the bottle it comes in. Perfect for everyday use.

Aged Organic Balsamic Vinegar
was $39.99, now $34.99

From Vecchia Dispensa, our favorite balsamic vinegar makers. An aged balsamic made from organic grapes. As elegant as the bottle it comes in. Perfect for everyday use.

Moutere Grove Olive Oil Moutere Grove Olive Oil

All the vibrancy of New Zealand in the summertime, captured in a bottle! These traditional Tuscan olive trees grown south of the equator are an excellent example of ‘terroir’- bold and grassy, with a big lasting flavor.

Morganster Olive Oil Morganster Olive Oil

South Africa has been known to produce some tasty wine, and some really amazing vinegar (Rozendal). But after tasting the Morganster, we should add olive oil to that list. A small estate oil, with big flavor: cut fresh grass, green tomatoes, almonds and a touch of red pepper come to mind when tasting. Great on a plate of hot pasta, or over a baked potato, or bowl of risotto.

Spanish Fruit and Nut Tortas Spanish Fruit and Nut Tortas

Naturally dried figs, dates or apricots married to almonds or walnuts. The original power bar or a satisfying nibble to accompany any cheese and meat spread.

January 2015 Specials

Matiz Madness Tinned Fish of the Month:
Matiz Madness

We’re featuring not one but all of the different oceanic delicacies from our friends at Matiz, who specialize in getting only the very best seafood from Galicia in North-Western Spain. Choose from a variety of briny treats that include rich and meaty sardines, spicy sardinillas and delicately plump cockles! All of them are as exciting and delicious as they are versatile.

Sardines – $3.95 (reg. $5.99)
Sardinillas – $4.60 (reg. $6.99)
Cockles – $7.90 (reg. $12.00)

Great Lakes Cheshire Cheese Zingerman’s Creamery Cheese of the Month:
Great Lakes Cheshire Cheese

Made with raw cow’s milk, this is our first-ever hard cheese! The Great Lakes Cheshire is a very old recipe that John learned from a Welsh cheese-maker 25 years ago. It is a quick-ripening variant that is perfect for the extremely rich milk we get from a small mixed-herd of cows. The cheese sports a natural rind that envelops a supple, slightly crumbly paste with a full and accessible flavor.

Serving Suggestions:
The Cheshire is a versatile table cheese which feels perfectly at home as the center of a cheese plate. However, our favorite way to eat it is to take a hunk of it, a few pickles (any kind), a nice thick slice of crusty farm bread, some sliced tomatoes and onions and tomatoes, and then wash it down with a nice frosty Kölsch.

$25.99/lb (reg. price $31.99/lb)

Rustic Italian Round Zingerman’s Bakehouse Bread of the Month:
Rustic Italian Round

One of our best selling breads for its versatility. It has a beautiful white crumb and a golden brown crust. This is that great simple, white European loaf. All it needs is some sweet butter.

$4.50/loaf

Special Bakes:

  • Rosemary Baguette 1/2 & 1/3
  • Cherry scones 1/2 1/3 1/4
  • Loomis Bread 1/9 1/10
  • Cheese Danish 1/9 1/10 1/11
  • Pumpernickel Raisin 1/16 1/17
  • Bacon Cheddar Scones 1/16 1/17 1/18
  • Barches 1/23 1/24
  • Applesauce Cake 1/23 1/24 1/25
  • Blueberry Buckle 1/29-2/1
  • Chernushka Rye 1/30 1/31
El Salvador - Finca San Joaquin Zingerman’s Coffee Co Roaster’s Pick:
El Salvador – Finca San Joaquin

This 100% bourbon cultivar comes from one of the highest elevation farms in
El Salvador’s western volcanic region. A super complex coffee — citrus and floral qualities, dried fruit, and plenty of sweetness.

Here’s a little factoid for your next dinner party, or to share with the person waiting next to you in the checkout line: remember Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s beloved novella The Little Prince? The volcanic region in which this coffee was grown served as inspiration for the three volcanos (two active, one dormant) in the story!

Region: Santa Ana, El Salvador
Cultivars: Bourbon
Processing: Washed
Altitude: 1500m

$17.99/12oz bag

The Ultimate Indulgence Zingerman’s Next Door, Drink of the Month: The Ultimate Indulgence

Caramel and Chocolate Mocha with Whipped Cream served with a salted chocolate caramel: Indulge!

$4.75/each

Cake of the Month Zingerman’s Bakehouse Cake of the Month: Raspberry White Chocolate Chiffon

It looks a little like a winter snowfall. It feels light and creamy. It tastes heavenly. Layers of vanilla chiffon cake sandwiched with vanilla bean pastry cream and seedless raspberry preserves, all covered in vanilla buttercream and white chocolate shavings.

20% off slices and whole cakes

Chocolate Promo Chocolate Covered Peanut Brittle on Sale!!

It’s everything you love about our peanut brittle, covered in chocolate! So good it made Ari’s Best of 2014 list this past December (only about 20 items make this year annually). 62% dark chocolate enveloping hand-pulled jumbo runner peanuts mixed with butter, sea salt and real vanilla and of course caramelized sugar. Crunchy, crispy, nutty, toasty and of course, delicious!

$2/2 oz bag (reg. price $3.99/each)